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Do you want to know how to detect head lice on your children? Your best bet is the “wet check.”

Lice head check

Weekly wet head checks are the best measure for early detection of head lice

 

So, you want to know how to detect head lice on your children. Well, research has shown that “wet checks” are the most reliable and effective method for detecting head lice. A wet check is done on wet or dampened hair with a good, high quality, solid stainless steel nit comb. Using a comb with a flimsy plastic handle or a poorly made comb will not yield an accurate result. In combing through dampened hair, one is examining what is removed for the presence of either lice or nits. The presence of either one is a confirmation that treatment for head lice is warranted.

If you’ve found something and you aren’t sure if it is a nit or not, feel free to email a photo of your suspicious object to: njlicelady@gmail.com  Please place your object on a white background next to a penny (in order to give perspective for size). See directly below. It is important that pictures be taken as close up as possible and as in focus as possible in a top down orientation.

How to detect head lice and nits

Close up of nits next to a penny

 

 

All Rights Reserved 2011-2016. Material May Not Be Reproduced Without Express Written Consent of the Author.

Finding a NJ lice treatment service can be difficult. With so many providers in the arena, it’s hard to decipher what everyone does for the fees they charge. Here are some things that I consider important about finding a lice treatment service in NJ or anywhere in the world!

1- Process: What do they do and how do they do it? Do they require you to come back to them? Do they charge for mandatory follow-up visits? How do they treat? Do they use a product reliable for eliminating live lice?

My answer: I treat by applying a dimethicone-based product to the hair and scalp of affected clients. I then complete a thorough comb out to remove nits from the hair using a solid stainless steel nit comb of the highest quality. Follow up visits are not needed and therefore are not included in my service, though clients are free to schedule a follow up visit if they desire one. I try to discourage people from doing so, simply because they are an unnecessary expense.

2- Products:  What kind of products does the service use? What are you obligated to buy? What does an average family spend on these products for a complete treatment cycle?

My answer: As mentioned above, I use a non-toxic, dimethicone-based product. In addition to the product which retails for $25 for a 12 oz bottle, I strongly encourage every family to purchase the same nit comb I use in my practice. The comb retails for $15. Most families will spend between $40-$65 for product and a comb to complete their treatment. Some families will choose to purchase a bottle of the KaPOW! Lice Defense Spray as well ($15) for use in preventing future lice outbreaks as well as facilitating comb outs.

3- Follow-Up: Perhaps the most important part of the treatment process is the follow-up required to make it successful. Will your service require you to perform daily comb outs in order to achieve a successful result? Will you need to complete daily treatments? What about housekeeping? Do they want you to clean/wash/boil the contents of your home on a daily basis to achieve a successful treatment outcome?

My answer: My clients complete two follow-up treatments at home using the above-mentioned non-toxic dimethicone-based product in addition to starting the ritual of weekly head checks done properly with a good quality stainless steel nit comb. While there is housekeeping to be done initially, the only thing I ask my clients to do after Day 1 is place their bedding in the dryer on the days they complete their follow-up treatments (2 more times). My clients are left with a schedule to follow and step-by-step instructions on exactly what needs to be done. The instructions are based in science and common sense. Any service that requires daily follow-up is asking their clients to do the “heavy lifting” for them. I question the value of a treatment a client purchases that requires them to do more work than the person they paid to treat them!

Finding a NJ Lice Treatment Service doesn’t have to be difficult if you know where to look! NJ Lice Lady provides safe, reliable, non-toxic lice treatment and nit removal for families from all over New Jersey. Low overhead allows me to provide world-class service at prices no lice treatment center in Cranford or Short Hills can match! Do you know someone who needs help with lice? Maybe it’s you? Give me a call and find out how affordable and uncomplicated good lice treatment can be! (908)548-4480 or njlicelady@gmail.com

 

Lisa Rafal, the NJ Lice Lady, is the former owner of franchised lice treatment centers in Clark and Fairfield, NJ. With a solid understanding of the problem and an empathy driven by having experienced lice as both a mother and as a pre-teen, Lisa is able to comfort families during the stress of dealing with lice. View the testimonials my clients have shared about the experiences with NJ Lice Lady and Lisa Rafal.

 

All Rights Reserved 2011-2014. Material may not be reproduced without the express written consent of the Author.

Late summer fun often is the lead-in to back to school lice outbreaks. Children who returned from camp, whether overnight or day camp, may be spreading their bounty to their friends in these first days of school. The gathering spot at my daughter’s elementary school was a veritable hug-fest today. Everyone fresh from summer vacation, happy to be reunited, warmly greeting one another on this, our first day of school. The Lice Lady in me was cringing.

 

Here’s everything you need to know about back to school lice outbreaks. This is knowledge I have gained from years as a lice treatment professional.

  1. While September is Head Lice Awareness Month, October actually is when the outbreaks typically peak. Many cases of lice don’t get discovered until they have festered long enough to spread to friends and family members. My own personal lice story begins in late October when my son was in first grade and had a bona fide Lice Circus on his head!
  2. Pesticide resistance is REAL! If you find your child has lice and you start treating with a pesticide, there is a better than even chance you will find the problem doesn’t resolve. Aside from being toxic and dangerous (in this woman’s opinion & many others) the permethrin and pyrethrins in OTC pesticides have become relatively useless against today’s lice.
  3. If you think that you know what you’re looking for, there’s a good chance you’re incorrect. Examining the scalp for nits will yield no result, likewise, searching for these tiny, sesame seed sized bug who are skilled in hiding from light will tend to be a fruitless endeavor.
  4. Even if you don’t end up treating professionally, which is not necessary, get a trusted professional to inform you. Purchase non-toxic products and remember that fighting lice is a process and it requires steadfast commitment. It cannot be done in a one time treatment, and it can be labor intensive.

Got any more questions about back to school lice outbreaks or lice treatment in NJ? Contact the NJ Lice Lady at njlicelady@gmail.com.

 

All Rights Reserved 2011-2014. Material May Not Be Reproduced Without Express Written Consent of the Author.

There is no one time lice treatment solution. Ever hear a lice treatment company publicize that their process was “one treatment” and that’s it? Don’t be fooled or misled by any person or company that touts a quick and simple solution to lice. Simply put, lice treatment is a process. It is something that always requires some degree of follow up to ensure success. There are no short cuts.

Once upon a time, I worked with a medical device to treat head lice. It boasted impressive statistics: it desiccated 99.2% of nits and killed about 87% of live bugs on a person’s head. The issue in this case being that additional steps were needed to ensure an end to any lice infestation. First, a comb out needed to be done, primarily for cosmetic reasons, but additionally, there needed to be an application of a product which eliminated live bugs that remained after the treatment with the heated air produced by the device. In fact, the cosmetic comb out and the product were the only essential parts of the process. The medical device increased treatment time in most cases, increased the cost of treatment, and aside from peace of mind, didn’t truly change the nature of the process.

NJ Lice Lady’s process is a simple one. Our one time in-person visit consists of an application of a non-toxic, dimethicone-based lice treatment product (KaPOW! Lice Attack Solution), followed by a thorough comb out, a simple at-home follow up protocol consisting of two more applications of the product and weekly head checks. If you are using a product reliable for the elimination of live bugs, it is not necessary to spend extra money to return to a lice treatment provider for professional follow up.

If you know someone who is battling a lice problem in New Jersey, tell them there is a better alternative to high-priced lice treatment centers. There is a resource for non-toxic lice treatment in NJ that doesn’t break the bank, and where the owner is always hands-on. Contact NJ Lice Lady (908)548-4480 or email njlicelady@gmail.com

 

All Rights Reserved 2011-2014. Material May Not Be Reproduced Without Express Written Consent of the Author.

I have a favorite comparison: When we fight cancer, we use chemotherapy because the poison is better than the cancer. When we fight lice, using poison makes no sense because methods far less toxic can do the job even better. This week I treated a young client who was exposed to a pesticide called Malathion. Malathion is only available by prescription and requires an 8-12 hour treatment. It is marketed under the name “Ovide.” Here is some basic information about Ovide and some other head lice pesticide treatments currently available by prescription and over the counter.


The CDC acknowledges that Ovide may only be partially ovicidal. This means that it only kills some lice eggs (nits) but not all. Further, this means that an additional 8-12 hour exposure may be necessary to kill any remaining bugs that hatch from those nits left viable after the treatment. I find it curious that a doctor would prescribe this as a first line treatment, knowing that it isn’t guaranteed to be a one time treatment. Of course, I’m not a doctor and I am not privvy to all the factors that went into making that decision.


So, then there is Lindane. Lindane is no longer recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, however, according the FDA, nearly 1 million prescriptions are written annually for this pesticide. It can have serious neurological side effects if misused and it is not a guaranteed ovicide. Aerial use of Lindane on crops is no longer permitted. Additionally, the FDA lists the possibility that a second application of Lindane may result in some severe side effects including death. I’d rather take my chances with the lice, thank you.


Moving down the line, we find Ulesfia. Ulesfia is a benzyl alcohol lotion. It is an effective pediculocide (it kills lice) but it is not an ovicide (it does not kill nits/eggs). This means that unless the viable nits are removed from the hair, they will continue the cycle of infestation. So, one either must comb the nits out of the hair completely, OR retreat with Ulesfia. The instructions recommend another treatment in 7 days. As someone who knows that the life cycle of the nit involves a 7-10 day incubation period, I would vehemently argue that the treatment needs to be repeated after 10 days not 7. That said, benzyl alcohol is systemically absorbed and it is toxic. I’d also like to point out that many people who have been experiencing a lice infestation tend to scratch their scalp. For a moment, imagine what it will feel like to apply alcohol to an irritated scalp. Makes you squirm, right? If one is only killing live lice and not nits, the same end could be achieved with a non-toxic product. Weighing the options, I still don’t understand using something more toxic when there is a suitable non-toxic option available. But that’s just me.


Next on the hit parade, we have Natroba. Recently approved by the FDA, this is a combination of the pesticide Spinosad and benzyl alcohol. Natroba claims to kill nits and therefore does not require that parents comb the nits out of the child’s hair in order for the treatment to be effective, however, there is also a recommendation that if there is live activity after 7 days, the product must be reapplied. This means that they know it isn’t killing 100% of the eggs. How does Spinosad kill lice you ask? Well, according to the product information “Spinosad causes neuronal excitation in insects. After periods of hyperexcitation, lice become paralyzed and die.” So, translating, the lice shake uncontrollably until they become paralyzed and die. Nice. Can’t wait to pour that on my kid’s head.

 

Also, more recent is Sklice, a topical preparation of Ivermectin, a pesticide that has been used orally for ringworm and scabies for many years. According to product literature provided by the manufacturer, there is no conclusive data as to whether Ivermectin causes cancer and Sklice is effective “about 75% of the time” at ending lice infestations. Given that it might cause cancer, how eager are you to risk being in the 25% of people who treat with this product and still have lice?


Now, on to the over-the-counter stuff. Pyrethrins with piperonyl butoxide is marketed under the popular name “Rid.” This product has been in use for decades and while it was once very effective against lice and their eggs, it has become less and less effective. Additionally, people who are allergic to chrysanthemums and/or ragweed may be advised not to use this product. Like antibiotic resistant bacteria, the lice have evolved immunity to the pesticides that have been in use for so long. Routinely, I treat clients in my office who have used these over-the-counter pesticides and still have live bugs in their hair. And even when the pesticide is successful in eliminating live activity, we know that the nits remain viable and a source of continued infestation.

There is also Permethrin. Permethrin 1% is marketed commonly under the name “Nix.”As with pyrethrins with piperonyl butoxide, lice have evolved a resistance to this pesticide. We routinely see clients who have used this product and present with live activity and/or continued infestation due to the fact that the nits have remained viable and have continued to hatch. Some clever manufacturers are now marketing a permethrin spray for the home so that worried parents can kill lice around their homes and in their cars. How nice. Interesting though, that with a vacuum or an adhesive lint roller, one can remove live lice from the home and other environments. Why companies are encouraging parents to spray poison in their homes in an effort to “clean” the home, I cannot explain or understand. Frankly, I’m not embarrassed to admit that it angers me. It angers me that these manufacturers prey on vulnerable parents and that they are fueling the very panic that keeps parents from reporting lice when it occurs in their home.

So, to sum up, we have Malathion, Lindane, Benzyl Alcohol, Spinosad with Benzyl Alcohol, Pyrethrins with Piperonyl Butoxide and Permethrin. There are non-toxic methods for dealing with head lice that are even more effective, so why would one choose something caustic or toxic for treating this problem? Have questions about how to handle a lice problem in your home? Send me an email njlicelady@gmail.com

 

All Rights Reserved 2011-2014. Material may not be reproduced without express written consent from the Author.