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How do you know a lice diagnosis is real? If a provider of lice treatment services is going to perform a treatment on a client, they should ABSOLUTELY be providing proof that the client in question does, in fact, have lice. What constitutes proof when making a lice diagnosis? Optimally, a hair plucked directly from the head of the individual (or on the head for a parent/caregiver to feel and see) with a nit on it is the proof you want to be given. Similarly, a live, moving bug (not a dead bug sitting around for the purposes of providing fake proof) on the head or pulled directly from the head in the view of the parent/caregiver. Finally, nits or live bugs combed from the hair during a proper head check done with a good quality nit comb that has been properly cleaned prior to being used on a new head. False diagnosis due to using a comb not properly cleaned can be an issue.

When I was seeing clients in my Fairfield and Clark, NJ lice treatment centers, I would regularly clear more people than I would treat. Now, in my new practice, I still clear more people than I treat! It is very common for a lice lady like me to see people who think they have lice, but don’t. The nice thing about doing head checks to clear people, aside from giving them peace of mind, is that I get to teach parents how to do proper head checks to prevent family-wide outbreaks from ever occurring in their homes.

Recently, NJ Lice Lady has seen several families from around NJ in which everyone (including dad!) has had lice. This is a result of lice infestation in one individual going an extended period of time without a proper lice diagnosis and/or not being treated effectively. Effective treatment of lice leads to the ending of outbreaks in towns, schools, social circles and families. However, you should only be treated if you have lice! Make sure you are being shown any evidence of lice infestation prior to allowing yourself or your family members to be treated. Not every lice treatment provider out there is operating with your best interests in mind. NJ Lice Lady is committed to ethical lice treatment practices and affordable pricing. When I opened my first lice treatment center in Clark, NJ, it was my dream to help families deal with lice effectively and with the highest level of care and compassion. Now, with NJ Lice Lady I am able to do what I wasn’t able to do as a high-overhead franchise owner. My lice treatment services are often at least HALF the cost of competing providers and my 100% success rate speaks for itself. Why pay more for sketchy lice treatment and nit removal services? Call NJ Lice Lady, where you’re treated like family. (908)548-4480 njlicelady@gmail.com

All rights reserved 2011-2014. Material may not be reproduced without express written consent of the author.

Finding a NJ lice treatment service can be difficult. With so many providers in the arena, it’s hard to decipher what everyone does for the fees they charge. Here are some things that I consider important about finding a lice treatment service in NJ or anywhere in the world!

1- Process: What do they do and how do they do it? Do they require you to come back to them? Do they charge for mandatory follow-up visits? How do they treat? Do they use a product reliable for eliminating live lice?

My answer: I treat by applying a dimethicone-based product to the hair and scalp of affected clients. I then complete a thorough comb out to remove nits from the hair using a solid stainless steel nit comb of the highest quality. Follow up visits are not needed and therefore are not included in my service, though clients are free to schedule a follow up visit if they desire one. I try to discourage people from doing so, simply because they are an unnecessary expense.

2- Products:  What kind of products does the service use? What are you obligated to buy? What does an average family spend on these products for a complete treatment cycle?

My answer: As mentioned above, I use a non-toxic, dimethicone-based product. In addition to the product which retails for $25 for a 12 oz bottle, I strongly encourage every family to purchase the same nit comb I use in my practice. The comb retails for $15. Most families will spend between $40-$65 for product and a comb to complete their treatment. Some families will choose to purchase a bottle of the KaPOW! Lice Defense Spray as well ($15) for use in preventing future lice outbreaks as well as facilitating comb outs.

3- Follow-Up: Perhaps the most important part of the treatment process is the follow-up required to make it successful. Will your service require you to perform daily comb outs in order to achieve a successful result? Will you need to complete daily treatments? What about housekeeping? Do they want you to clean/wash/boil the contents of your home on a daily basis to achieve a successful treatment outcome?

My answer: My clients complete two follow-up treatments at home using the above-mentioned non-toxic dimethicone-based product in addition to starting the ritual of weekly head checks done properly with a good quality stainless steel nit comb. While there is housekeeping to be done initially, the only thing I ask my clients to do after Day 1 is place their bedding in the dryer on the days they complete their follow-up treatments (2 more times). My clients are left with a schedule to follow and step-by-step instructions on exactly what needs to be done. The instructions are based in science and common sense. Any service that requires daily follow-up is asking their clients to do the “heavy lifting” for them. I question the value of a treatment a client purchases that requires them to do more work than the person they paid to treat them!

Finding a NJ Lice Treatment Service doesn’t have to be difficult if you know where to look! NJ Lice Lady provides safe, reliable, non-toxic lice treatment and nit removal for families from all over New Jersey. Low overhead allows me to provide world-class service at prices no lice treatment center in Cranford or Short Hills can match! Do you know someone who needs help with lice? Maybe it’s you? Give me a call and find out how affordable and uncomplicated good lice treatment can be! (908)548-4480 or njlicelady@gmail.com

 

Lisa Rafal, the NJ Lice Lady, is the former owner of franchised lice treatment centers in Clark and Fairfield, NJ. With a solid understanding of the problem and an empathy driven by having experienced lice as both a mother and as a pre-teen, Lisa is able to comfort families during the stress of dealing with lice. View the testimonials my clients have shared about the experiences with NJ Lice Lady and Lisa Rafal.

 

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Effective and affordable head lice treatment in NJ is hard to come by. There are many people who will say they are professionals, but I have noticed that many of them don’t really understand the science of head lice themselves. Sadly, that doesn’t keep them from charging some outrageous fees for their services. It also doesn’t make them successful at what they do. When I started out as a lice treatment professional, I purchased a franchise and opened an office in Clark, NJ. It seemed like a good idea at the time. What I learned, unfortunately, is that the high overhead of running a franchised business makes being profitable nearly impossible. Despite having raised my fees, I was unable to sustain the business.

From all things, we learn. I saw in the years that I was running that office, that many families simply could not afford to treat their children professionally. It made me sad to see children being treated with toxic chemicals simply because of the economics of head lice treatment. The worst part was knowing that those same children would likely experience treatment failure because of the unreliability of those products. It didn’t seem fair.

The truth is that lice is a big business. If you believe some things I’ve read, it’s a billion dollar a year industry. Why do drugstores carry products that don’t work? Well, if you have to keep buying them, they get to keep making sales, don’t they? I hate conspiracy theories, but the CDC and AAP still, despite mountains of evidence that shows pesticide resistance is a solid fact, continue to recommend Permethrin and Piperonyl Butoxide (Nix and Rid) as a first line treatment. Why? Why have they not endorsed, unequivocally, non-toxic lice treatment? There have been 3 new prescription lice products approved by the FDA in the time I’ve been treating lice professionally. Why are we pushing possible carcinogens onto children’s heads when a simple non-toxic product like dimethicone, found in the product I use and sell (KaPOW! Lice Attack Solution), kills lice in minutes and is as safe as any styling product found in a salon? Is it because treating lice right the first time would mean that people didn’t keep buying more product? I hope not.

The same holds true for lice treatment professionals. They want you to think it’s magical mystical stuff we do. Outside the “wheelhouse” of the average parent. It’s not. That’s why I want to teach parents what to do instead of treating their kids for them. Some parents don’t want to know and don’t want to deal with it. That’s fine. Those parents have the resources to pay someone to do it for them and that’s great. I love treating lice and will happily help a family that way! For the parents who don’t have the money to pay someone to do it for them, there needs to be a reliable alternative that is affordable for them. This is why I created my Head Lice 101 DIY approach to head lice treatment. I’m here to help and I want to make this less burdensome and more cost-effective for families in NJ. If you’re interested in learning how to detect lice proactively, and you’d like to host a parents’ workshop in your home, email me at Contact me

 

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Today I was doing my usual look through Google Analytics to see how people have found my blog. Someone was referred here after querying “can you use Ulesfia and Nix together”. I wish I had been standing here face-to-face with that person. My answer? NO!! I don’t like either of those products because they are both toxic. Setting that aside, they are both supposed to do the same thing…kill live lice. Even though the Nix packaging claims to kill nits (lice eggs) we know that it doesn’t do that reliably at all. It doesn’t even kill live bugs reliably.

There are strains of head lice which appear to be pesticide resistant. My guess is that the person who input that search query was dealing with one of them. When using a lice treatment product, if you still see live activity after the first application, you must assume that you have a resistant strain of lice and move on to something else. And by something else, I don’t intend for people to move on to a stronger, more toxic pesticide! There are very effective, non-toxic treatments available. There are also safe, non-toxic products available over-the-counter.

If I could have a moment of face time with every parent who is dealing with head lice infestation in their family, I would tell them that it is not necessary or even preferable to utilize toxic agents to eliminate lice. Of course when it’s found on the shelves of a pharmacy or written on a piece of paper by a physician, it seems simple and safe. Take note: there are pesticides out there that are highly toxic and available by prescription. I have had parents in my office sheepishly admitting that they checked their children’s breathing hourly while they slept with a pesticide that stunk so badly they feared their kids would suffocate from it. I have read the warnings about pesticides so toxic they are banned from use on crops and yet they are readily available in a pharmacy with a prescription.

Lice don’t kill people. Lice don’t cause cancer. Lice don’t cause neurological side effects. Lice are uncomfortable, unsettling, and perhaps even distasteful. They are also easily eradicated when using the proper methods. Contact me for more information on safe and effective lice treatment! Email or njlicelady@gmail.com.

 

All Rights Reserved 2011-2014. Material may not be reproduced without express written consent of the Author

I have a favorite comparison: When we fight cancer, we use chemotherapy because the poison is better than the cancer. When we fight lice, using poison makes no sense because methods far less toxic can do the job even better. This week I treated a young client who was exposed to a pesticide called Malathion. Malathion is only available by prescription and requires an 8-12 hour treatment. It is marketed under the name “Ovide.” Here is some basic information about Ovide and some other head lice pesticide treatments currently available by prescription and over the counter.


The CDC acknowledges that Ovide may only be partially ovicidal. This means that it only kills some lice eggs (nits) but not all. Further, this means that an additional 8-12 hour exposure may be necessary to kill any remaining bugs that hatch from those nits left viable after the treatment. I find it curious that a doctor would prescribe this as a first line treatment, knowing that it isn’t guaranteed to be a one time treatment. Of course, I’m not a doctor and I am not privvy to all the factors that went into making that decision.


So, then there is Lindane. Lindane is no longer recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, however, according the FDA, nearly 1 million prescriptions are written annually for this pesticide. It can have serious neurological side effects if misused and it is not a guaranteed ovicide. Aerial use of Lindane on crops is no longer permitted. Additionally, the FDA lists the possibility that a second application of Lindane may result in some severe side effects including death. I’d rather take my chances with the lice, thank you.


Moving down the line, we find Ulesfia. Ulesfia is a benzyl alcohol lotion. It is an effective pediculocide (it kills lice) but it is not an ovicide (it does not kill nits/eggs). This means that unless the viable nits are removed from the hair, they will continue the cycle of infestation. So, one either must comb the nits out of the hair completely, OR retreat with Ulesfia. The instructions recommend another treatment in 7 days. As someone who knows that the life cycle of the nit involves a 7-10 day incubation period, I would vehemently argue that the treatment needs to be repeated after 10 days not 7. That said, benzyl alcohol is systemically absorbed and it is toxic. I’d also like to point out that many people who have been experiencing a lice infestation tend to scratch their scalp. For a moment, imagine what it will feel like to apply alcohol to an irritated scalp. Makes you squirm, right? If one is only killing live lice and not nits, the same end could be achieved with a non-toxic product. Weighing the options, I still don’t understand using something more toxic when there is a suitable non-toxic option available. But that’s just me.


Next on the hit parade, we have Natroba. Recently approved by the FDA, this is a combination of the pesticide Spinosad and benzyl alcohol. Natroba claims to kill nits and therefore does not require that parents comb the nits out of the child’s hair in order for the treatment to be effective, however, there is also a recommendation that if there is live activity after 7 days, the product must be reapplied. This means that they know it isn’t killing 100% of the eggs. How does Spinosad kill lice you ask? Well, according to the product information “Spinosad causes neuronal excitation in insects. After periods of hyperexcitation, lice become paralyzed and die.” So, translating, the lice shake uncontrollably until they become paralyzed and die. Nice. Can’t wait to pour that on my kid’s head.

 

Also, more recent is Sklice, a topical preparation of Ivermectin, a pesticide that has been used orally for ringworm and scabies for many years. According to product literature provided by the manufacturer, there is no conclusive data as to whether Ivermectin causes cancer and Sklice is effective “about 75% of the time” at ending lice infestations. Given that it might cause cancer, how eager are you to risk being in the 25% of people who treat with this product and still have lice?


Now, on to the over-the-counter stuff. Pyrethrins with piperonyl butoxide is marketed under the popular name “Rid.” This product has been in use for decades and while it was once very effective against lice and their eggs, it has become less and less effective. Additionally, people who are allergic to chrysanthemums and/or ragweed may be advised not to use this product. Like antibiotic resistant bacteria, the lice have evolved immunity to the pesticides that have been in use for so long. Routinely, I treat clients in my office who have used these over-the-counter pesticides and still have live bugs in their hair. And even when the pesticide is successful in eliminating live activity, we know that the nits remain viable and a source of continued infestation.

There is also Permethrin. Permethrin 1% is marketed commonly under the name “Nix.”As with pyrethrins with piperonyl butoxide, lice have evolved a resistance to this pesticide. We routinely see clients who have used this product and present with live activity and/or continued infestation due to the fact that the nits have remained viable and have continued to hatch. Some clever manufacturers are now marketing a permethrin spray for the home so that worried parents can kill lice around their homes and in their cars. How nice. Interesting though, that with a vacuum or an adhesive lint roller, one can remove live lice from the home and other environments. Why companies are encouraging parents to spray poison in their homes in an effort to “clean” the home, I cannot explain or understand. Frankly, I’m not embarrassed to admit that it angers me. It angers me that these manufacturers prey on vulnerable parents and that they are fueling the very panic that keeps parents from reporting lice when it occurs in their home.

So, to sum up, we have Malathion, Lindane, Benzyl Alcohol, Spinosad with Benzyl Alcohol, Pyrethrins with Piperonyl Butoxide and Permethrin. There are non-toxic methods for dealing with head lice that are even more effective, so why would one choose something caustic or toxic for treating this problem? Have questions about how to handle a lice problem in your home? Send me an email njlicelady@gmail.com

 

All Rights Reserved 2011-2014. Material may not be reproduced without express written consent from the Author.